Category Archives: Folklore

The Unusual Suspects 3- The Midgard Serpent

Welcome back to my blog series about the three prominent dragons of Norse mythology. If you’ll recall, we started with Nidhogg, the corpse-eating dragon of the underworld, and continued on to Fafnir, the dwarf-turned-dragon who died protecting his cursed gold. … Continue reading

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The Unusual Suspects 2– Fafnir

On July 27, 2017, we began our tour through a trinity of prominent Norse dragons with Nidhogg, the corpse-eating serpent of Niflheim. Turning to the second in the series, we’ll emerge from the misty underworld and travel to Nidavellir (sometimes … Continue reading

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The Unusual Suspects: Norse Dragons (Part 1)

When one tries to imagine what kind of problems a dragon might have, the mind goes to a distinctly medieval place—perhaps the inability to get one’s hoard of jewels shiny enough, knights trying to slay you, or princesses resisting being … Continue reading

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The Evolution of Little Red Riding Hood

In the beginning, fairytales were not intended for children.[1] Rather, they were a way for adults to pass the time as they labored, keeping their minds occupied while their hands were busy crafting, spinning, or mending. Consequently, the content of … Continue reading

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Of Murder, Black Magic, and Sorceous Familiars: Redcaps, Part 2

            Last week, I kicked off my blog series about the folklore that inspired my short story, “Jenny Redcape,” by giving a general rundown on redcaps. This week, we’ll revisit the subject to talk about … Continue reading

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Folklore and Inspiration: Redcaps, Pt. 1.

          There is a deep, dark forest of folklore out there, just waiting to be explored. Some parts of it are strange and unsettling. Other parts are lighter, a dazzle of sunlight through the leaves. But … Continue reading

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Of Sirens and Sorrow

**This post was originally featured on Rhonda Parrish’s blog.** “The Mermaid and the Dolphin” Arthur Rackham (1908). The ocean. So beautiful. So mysterious. So “full of fish,” as Kevin Kline’s character from French Kiss observed. And merfolk, maybe? For thousands of … Continue reading

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